Tech Writing Sample > Automate the Renewal of a Let’s Encrypt SSL/TLS Certificate on an AWS EC2 Instance

This is part of my Introduction to Installing Let’s Encrypt Certificates for WordPress on Amazon Web Services (AWS) tutorial.

In Renew a Let’s Encrypt SSL/TLS Certificate on an AWS EC2 Instance I went over the steps to renew your Let’s Encrypt SSL/TLS certificate, which will expire every 90 days. It’s good to know how to renew the certificate yourself, but once you do you can write a bash script to automate that renewal process. Here’s a basic overview of how that works:

  1. Create a bash script that executes the same renew command from Renew a Let’s Encrypt SSL/TLS Certificate on an AWS EC2 Instance.
  2. Upload that bash script to your EC2 instance.
  3. Create a cron job. Cron is a function in Linux that allows you to schedule automated tasks, usually by executing a bash script that runs at a specific time and a specific interval. In this example, we will execute the bash script at midnight on the first day of every month.

Unfortunately, when I tried this, it didn’t actually work for me. So the steps below provide a description of the symptom, along with my workaround.
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Tech Writing Sample > Renew a Let’s Encrypt SSL/TLS Certificate on an AWS EC2 Instance

This is part of my Introduction to Installing Let’s Encrypt Certificates for WordPress on Amazon Web Services (AWS) tutorial.

In Install a Let’s Encrypt SSL/TLS Certificate on an AWS EC2 Instance, we learned how to install the Lego client to create and manage TLS/SSL certificates provided by Let’s Encrypt. The certificates issued by Let’s Encrypt expire every 90 days, so you will need to renew them before they expire to maintain your website’s HTTPS connection. Let’s Encrypt will send you an email to notify you that your certificate is expiring soon.

It only takes a few minutes on the command line to renew the certificate. Try the below steps to get familiar with the renewal process, but once you do so you can also Automate the Renewal of a Let’s Encrypt SSL/TLS Certificate on an AWS EC2 Instance.

In this example I am renewing a Let’s Encrypt SSL/TLS certificate on a LAMP-stack virtual server (in this case an EC2 instance from Amazon Web Services) over Secure Shell (SSH) using the command line. I am using the macOS Terminal, which is Unix-based, but the commands will be the same regardless of what command-line interface you are using.

Warning

  • When working with SSL/TLS certificates, be very careful. If you are planning on adding, renewing, or removing an SSL/TLS certificate, make sure you create a complete backup of your website before trying anything.
  • If you are working with AWS EC2 instances, always take a snapshot of the instance’s storage volume before you try any of these steps. If anything goes wrong, you can always stop the instance, detach the volume, and attach a new volume created from your snapshot.

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Tech Writing Sample > Install a Let’s Encrypt SSL/TLS Certificate on an AWS EC2 Instance

This is part of my Introduction to Installing Let’s Encrypt Certificates for WordPress on Amazon Web Services (AWS) tutorial.

This post will go over the steps needed to use your command-line interface to download and install Lego, a Let’s Encrypt Client written in the Go programming language. Lego will allow you to create and manage SSL/TLS certificates from the Let’s Encrypt Certificate Authority.

In this example I am installing a Let’s Encrypt certificate on a LAMP-stack virtual server (in this case an EC2 instance from Amazon Web Services) over Secure Shell (SSH). After that, I’ll show you how to download a copy of your certificates and account information using an FTP client. I am using the macOS Terminal, which is Unix-based, but the Linux commands will be the same regardless of what command-line interface you are using. I am also using the Cyberduck FTP client, but any FTP client should work.

Warning

  • When working with SSL/TLS certificates, be very careful. If you are planning on adding, renewing, or removing an SSL/TLS certificate, make sure you create a complete backup of your website before trying anything.
  • If you are working with AWS EC2 instances, always take a snapshot of the instance’s storage volume before you try any of these steps. If anything goes wrong, you can always stop the instance, detach the volume, and attach a new volume created from your snapshot.

Continue reading “Install a Let’s Encrypt SSL/TLS Certificate on an AWS EC2 Instance”

Website > Massolit-Media.com: v2.0, “MoBerry” Portfolio Website (2017)

Business Skills:
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Tech Writing Sample > WordPress on Amazon EC2: Permission Denied Error Message

This is part of my Introduction to Hosting WordPress on Amazon Web Services (AWS) tutorial.

  • Are you new to hosting WordPress on Amazon Web Services (AWS) EC2 instances?
  • Are you having problems accessing the files in your WordPress installation via FTP?
  • Do you see a Permission denied error message when you try to upload, edit, or delete a file from your WordPress Installation using FTP?

Read these instructions for a quick (and dirty) fix to this problem. After that, if you want, you can read on for an explanation.
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Tech Writing Sample > WordPress on Amazon EC2: Connect to an Instance via FTP

This is part of my Introduction to Hosting WordPress on Amazon Web Services (AWS) tutorial.

In this tutorial we are going to go over the steps needed to access youur WordPress files by connecting to an Amazon Web Services (AWS) EC2 instance over FTP (or, more accurately, SFTP) using an FTP client. In my case I am using Cyberduck, an FTP client for macOS. I will also need the address and login credentials for the server I am trying to connect to, including the private key needed to authenticate an SSH connection with the server.
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Tech Writing Sample > WordPress on Amazon EC2: Connect to an Instance via SSH

This is part of my Introduction to Hosting WordPress on Amazon Web Services (AWS) tutorial.

In this tutorial we are going to go over the steps needed to connect to a virtual server (in this case an EC2 instance from Amazon Web Services) over Secure Shell (SSH) using the command line. In my case I am using the macOS Terminal, which is Unix-based, but the commands will be the same regardless of what command-line interface you are using.
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Tech Writing Sample > WordPress on Amazon EC2: Naming Your EC2 Instances

This is part of my Introduction to Hosting WordPress on Amazon Web Services (AWS) tutorial.

In Launch an Amazon Web Services (AWS) EC2 Instance to Create a WordPress Site we set up an EC2 instance as a resource for a WordPress site. Regardless of what your EC2 instance is a resource for, these tips can help you better manage your EC2 instances. I am using Firefox on a Mac, but these steps are platform- and browser-agnostic. In addition, you will need an AWS account and you will need to log in to that account as a root user or as an IAM user with admin privileges.

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Tech Writing Sample > WordPress on Amazon EC2: Launch an EC2 Instance to Create a WordPress Site

This is part of my Introduction to Hosting WordPress on Amazon Web Services (AWS) tutorial.

In this post I am going to walk through the steps for launching an EC2 instance in Amazon Web Services (AWS). I will be launching an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) from the AWS Marketplace that is specifically created to run a WordPress site. I am using Firefox on a Mac, but these steps are platform- and browser-agnostic. All you need is an AWS account and to log in to that AWS account as either the root user, or, if you have set up IAM (Identity and Access Management) accounts, then your IAM user account will need to have admin privileges.
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